marinaguaui:

yeah Nice, focus that hate and Kill Moral already

marinaguaui:

yeah Nice, focus that hate and Kill Moral already

79 notes

instagram:

Celebrating March 14, π Day!

Explore Pi Day creations from around the globe and share your own with the #piday, #pipie and #π hashtags.

This Friday, math and pastry enthusiasts around the world celebrate Pi Day, the day when the date (3/14) matches the first three digits of the mathematical constant π (3.14).

Even those with a passing interest in mathematics use today as an excuse to test their baking skills, indulge in the baking prowess of others and snap some photos and videos along the way.

3,770 notes

blueberryscience:

Nice Hamatora - Hamatora Opening

blueberryscience:

Nice Hamatora - Hamatora Opening

39 notes

instagram:

Exploring Middle Earth on Instagram

To see more photos and videos from Hobbiton, explore the Middle Earth location page.

Ever since English author J.R.R. Tolkien first published his fantasy novel, The Hobbit, in 1937, readers around the world have been enchanted by the sprawling landscapes of Middle Earth. Nearly seventy years later in 2001, director Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings film series brought Tolkien’s world to life on the silver screen. With much of the film shot in New Zealand, the country has come to be known as the “Home of Middle Earth.”

Over 250 locations throughout New Zealand were used in the production of the films, taking full advantage of the diversity in the country’s landscape. From expansive fields and lush farmlands to snow-capped mountains, New Zealand’s features opened ample opportunities to make Middle Earth real.

With the release of The Hobbit film series, the sets from Hobbiton—home of Bilbo and Frodo Baggins—have been reconstructed and are open to tourists. Instagrammers from around the world have come to explore and share photos and videos from their time in Tolkien’s world.

6,712 notes

instagram:

Photographing New York City from Above with @wrongrob

To view more photos and videos from a bird’s-eye perspective of New York, follow @wrongrob on Instagram

Rob Masao McCarthy (@wrongrob) is a father of three in Brooklyn, New York. Outside of his day job as a freelance digital media consultant and photographer, Rob gets his thrills scaling New York City’s tallest bridges, trams, roofs and skyscrapers to shoot the city from above.

"I first developed an interest in photography shooting street portraits of the people of New York City. Then I realized that I was really interested in the city itself as a subject," he says. "I discovered that the higher up and further away I got, the more the immense city was reduced to shapes, lines and angles. There is a peace and universality in that geometry that I really like. Somehow it makes the city more human."

Want to refine the compositions of your cityscapes? Here are Rob’s tips:

  • Pay attention to depth of field in your frame. Try to include a distinct foreground, middle ground and background, which helps create a sense of scale and distance. A mix of different building heights helps too.
  • Look for an interesting street angle within the buildings that will draw your viewers into the photo. Avoid shooting straight in front of you and placing the primary subject in the middle of the frame.
  • To add atmosphere and mood to cityscape shots, shoot on cloudy or rainy days. Hard, bright light is not your friend!
  • I am always safe and law-abiding, of course, but if you’re trying to get to a building’s upper levels, skip the elevator and look for the stairs. You’ll be surprised where you end up.

2,452 notes